School’s in Session: 8th Grade

Bailey – 8th Grade:

Physical Science – So far so good, as far as I know. I will admit at this point that I’ve been hands-off in Bailey’s science this year and need to focus a bit more on it.  The luxury comes in the fact that he’s ear-reading and another homeschooling mom is heading the experiments at co-op.  Because I don’t like science I tend to put it off and probably at the detriment of my students.  (SORRY KIDS!!)
Algebra 1– Bailey’s dyslexic brain makes mental math much easier for him than it does for some students.  He can often see the answer in his mind long before I can get to it on paper.  This is a benefit, for sure, but a stumbling block in many ways, as he needs to master the long way of working problems so that when they are more complicated, he is able to follow the path the math requires him to follow. Working on that a bit this year, as we have every. single. year.  A student who can often see the answer in his head understandably feels no need to do the paper work required to get the answer, showing all the steps.  It feels stupid and unnecessary.  What I know, as a teacher, is that the problems are going to be more complicated soon and will require 4-6 steps.  If he doesn’t show his work and gets the answer wrong, he’ll have to start all over, instead of just going back to the step where the mistake was made.  This is one of the most difficult aspects of dyslexia in my opinion.
Writing – As I mentioned above, Carson and Bailey are doing the same writing program and I’m extremely pleased with where they are.  Bailey’s writing sounds fluid and natural. He’s beginning to see that, quite often, the “dress-ups” are coming out in his first draft rather than having to be added in later.  This is proof that the formula is converting to instinct!
Literature and History – Last year I started Carson and Bailey out with Core 100: American History.  Within a few weeks I realized I was going to have to let Carson move ahead of Bailey and I felt it had a lot to do with Bailey’s dyslexia. I called Sonlight and spoke with an advisor.  God directed me to the perfect advisor as she had done the high school cores with her son who also had dyslexia.  She surprised me, though.  She told me that even students who were not dyslexic but were taking Core 100 in the 7th grade were encouraged to spread it out over two years!  It wasn’t just the fact that Bailey was dyslexic that was making it take us longer to get through certain books, it was his age.  I believe this made him feel much better and so we are just now, in his 8th grade year, finishing up the core he started last year.  Going at our own pace has made the material sink in much deeper and with absolutely no stress.  He’ll probably finish the core in the spring and will start on Core 200, the one Carson is currently on, at that time.
P.E. – Bailey bikes all over post to hang out with friends, but lately he’s been on a running kick.  He’s trying to run farther distances and increase his speed, and I enjoy seeing him excited about pushing himself to do better.  I keep saying I am going to get out there and run with him… maybe this week will be the week!
German –  Rosetta Stone
Speech – At Co-op

Bailey at Co-op playing Ge-to-know-you-BINGO:

IMG_2998

 

About Jennifer

"Yes, they're all mine." The answer to the question I hear most often.
This entry was posted in family. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to School’s in Session: 8th Grade

  1. Debra says:

    Re: paper organization
    If you have a set place for school ( the office) don’t let him go find the papers he didn’t bring into the office. Then there is a consequence for not having things organized . As I write this half if my brain is saying oh that’s unnecessarily punitive. However, the size of my brain that remembers how many times I go up and downstairs before I get the materials I need to work on the computer I say, start young to build that organization.

  2. Pingback: A Teacher’s Summer | thehamricks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s